Novella Update! And It’s Good News!

As a few of you already know, I resubmitted the first 3 chapters of my novella ‘The Last Dragon Rider’ at the beginning of February after completing the revisions the editor suggested.

Well, last week I heard back, and I’m very excited to report it was positive news. I still have a ways to go, but I’m more than willing to put in the work, and, more importantly, the editor is more than willing to work with me.

My writing qualifications consist of me acing high school English and Literature with a bunch of A+’s. I was not fortunate enough to know back then that I could have studied writing and editing at university, or had the forethought to know that my dabbling could in fact turn into something more. So I appreciate the fact that I still have a lot to lean.

Anyway, I have copied the email here so you can read for yourself.

 

“Dear Errin, 

I am so sorry it’s taken longer than I told you to review the edits I asked for. Please see my comments below. 

Thank you so much for using the suggestions I gave you. I would like to see even more work on the point of view.  It is still off in places, especially when speaking of hands, brows, and making love. Also, if you could come up with maybe a more fantastic word for shit, just as you have for different words and phrases, you already use. Speaking of phrases and words, it would help to insert a short meaning of what the new phrases and words you are incorporating, so readers will understand. You only have to do it the first time the word is used, and then you can do a glossary in the book so they can refresh their memory if needed. 

Try to not use repetitive sentences or starting sentences with the character’s names so much. Go over the entire manuscript for spelling errors and extraneous words, words you don’t need. You want the information and the book to flow, not break it up by repeating too much. Keep it short and to the point. You are leaving words out of sentences. That happens when a writer knows what she wants to say but her fingers do not always get it typed out.  Read the work out loud, it will help you see the mistakes that your word program does not pick up.  

I am truly enthralled with this story. However, there are a lot of things, some of them I pointed out already, that will need to be fixed before I can even think about offering a contract. I am more than willing to work with you but I need to make sure that you can get the first 3 chapters to where they need to be. You’ve done an excellent job on what I’ve asked for before but there are still problem spots that need to be addressed. I think this is going to be like a learning experience. Let me know if this is something you want to do and I will be happy to assist.

Also, if you take this on, then I do not want to see this manuscript back until all items are fixed. I say this because it is too easy to go in and try to do a quick fix to get it back to the editor. What it does a lot of times, is just clog up the line of contract. The more you rush, the more time we have to take to fix the problems you missed. Does this make sense? However, if you do agree, then I am most willing to see the book back around July 1st. Yes, I know that is a time span, but if you were under contract already, you would still have to complete the problems. I would love to see what you can do, and if you have questions please let me know. Not only now but during the editing process.”

 

Now I dunno about you, but I am very happy with this feedback! And I’m super excited to get started on edits!

E.K

You can find me @ my Website, Facebook, & Twitter.

If you are are fellow writer check out our writing group @ The Writers Lounge

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3 Comments Add yours

  1. Kevin says:

    Divergent started as a 50k manuscript with raw characters and an unpolsihed world. The editor was able to spot the creativity of the premise. Veronica Roth doubled the word count and reworked much for the final draft.

    Never be discouraged!

    Liked by 1 person

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